The Project | Overview

The rise and fall of the pine marten

In the ancient wildwoods that once blanketed much of Britain, the pine marten was one of our most common carnivores, thriving amongst the diversity of trees and shrubs that offered a year round supply of food and snug tree holes in which to den.

Pine marten numbers declined dramatically during the 19th and early 20th century as a result of the combined impact of continued habitat loss and an increase in predator control associated with the growth in Victorian game shooting estates. Today, whilst the pine marten population in Scotland is recovering and expanding, the marten population in England and Wales has shown no sign of recovery and the likely outcome is extinction.

The VWT’s Pine Marten Recovery Project aims to restore viable populations of pine martens to Wales and England, focusing on those areas within the marten’s natural range where habitat and other conditions are suitable. A major part of this work will involve the reinforcement or reintroduction of pine martens. Between 2015 – 2017, the VWT has translocated a total of 51 pine martens from Scotland to mid-Wales. The translocated pine martens are closely monitored, have become established and have bred every year since the translocation began.

 

Why restore the pine marten?

The pine marten is part of our rich wildlife heritage. It plays an integral role in a healthy, balanced woodland ecosystem and can be an important predator of pest species, such as grey squirrels. As a bonus, re-establishing pine martens in England and Wales also has the potential to benefit the rural economy, as has been the case in Scotland, through the creation of tourism opportunities for people who are keen to see this captivating woodland animal.